Airbus A350 XWB  (800 and 1000 Models)

Download A350-800-XWB for FS9     (Standard And 2014 Olympic Models Included)

Download A350-1000-XWB for FS9     (Standard And 2014 Olympic Models Included)

Download A350-800-XWB for FSX    (Standard Model Only) 

Download A350-800-XWB for FSX    (2014 Olympic Model)  

Download A350-1000-XWB for FSX    (Standard Model Only)  

Download A350-1000-XWB for FSX    (2014 Olympic Model)  


Range (800XWB) -  8,480 nm/ 9,758 miles   Passengers - 270-440   Speed   M 0.85  (487 kts) 561 mph.
These aircraft include Ground Servicing Equipment.

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Specifications

Cockpit Crew............................... 2
Length........................................ 60.54 m (198.6 ft)
Wingspan................................... 64.8 m (213 ft)
Height........................................ 6.09 m (20.0 ft)
Fuselage Width............................................. 5.96 m (19.6 ft)
Typical Empty Weight..................181 t (399,000 lb)
MTOW (Max Take-off Weight)...... 259 t (571,000 lb)
Typical Cruising Speed................. Mach 0.85 (903 km/h, 561 mph, 487 knots, at 40,000 ft or 12.19 km)
Service Ceiling............................ 43,100 ft (13.1 km)
Range (Fully Loaded).................. 15,700 km (8,480 nmi)
       
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ROLE

The Airbus A350-800XWB  (Extra Wide Body) is a Long Range Jet Airliner. The A350 is the first
Airbus with both fuselage and wing structures made primarily of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer.
Airbus stated that it will be more fuel-efficient and have operating costs up to 8% lower than the Boeing 787.
As of May 2013, Airbus has received 613 aircraft orders from 33 different customers around the globe.
The prototype A350 first flew on 14 June 2013 at Toulouse-Blagnac Airport, France.

Engines supplied for the A350-800 are the Rolls Royce Trent XWB engine rated at
75,00093,000 lbf (330410 kN) each, developed from the Trent 1000.  These engines
have a fan diameter of 9 feet and an airflow of approximately 3,200 pounds per second.