Douglas  DC-8-63
Certified for FS2004

Download DC-8-63

Douglas DC-8-63CF / Range 7,008 mi  / Max. Cruise Speed - 596 kts  / Pax = 200-269
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Specifications

Cockpit Crew......................................... 2
Seating Capacity.................................... 251269 passengers (coach), 200212 passengers (mixed)
Length.................................................. 187 ft 4 in (57.10 m)
Wingspan............................................. 148 ft 5 in (45.24 m)
Height.................................................. 43 ft 0 in (13.11 m)
MTOW (Max-Take-off Weight)................ 275,000 lb (137.5 tons)
Service Ceiling...................................... 36,000 ft
Range (Full Payload)..................................... 7,008 miles
Engines.............4 Pratt & Whitney JT3D-7 turbofans,
19,000 lb (84.51 kN) each
Total Produced ................. 556

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ROLE

Douglas DC-8

The Douglas DC-8 is a four-engined narrow-body passenger commercial jet
 airliner, manufactured from 1958 to 1972 by the Douglas Aircraft Company.
 Launched later than the competing Boeing 707, the DC-8 nevertheless established
 Douglas in a strong position in the airliner market, and remained in production
 until 1972 when it began to be superseded by much larger designs, including
 the DC-10 and Boeing 747. The DC-8 design allowed it to hold slightly more
 cargo than the 707. Dozens of re-engined examples remain in freighter service
 to this day, while commercial 707 service had largely ended by 2000.

In April 1965, Douglas announced belated fuselage stretches for the DC-8 with
 three new models known as the Super Sixties. The DC-8 program had been in
danger of closing with fewer than 300 aircraft sold, but the Super Sixties brought
fresh life to it. By the time production ceased in 1972, 262 of the stretched DC-8s
 had been made. With the ability to seat 269 passengers, the DC-8 Series 61 and 63
 had the largest passenger-carrying capacity available. That remained
 so until the Boeing 747 arrived in 1970.